When Dreams Turn to Nightmares: Why You Should Never Bet The Business On A Single Project

It’s the kind of project a Texas contractor would love to be involved in. There’s a huge plant going up. The project is approved by all required government entities. The state governor endorses it and it appears to be backed by more money than the Dallas Cowboys! What’s not to love right? Well, unfortunately, all that glitters is not always gold and for a number of Texas companies, this dream project became a nightmare.

In 2011, Mossi & Ghisolfi Group, an Italian petrochemical company decided to bring a multibillion dollar plastic plant to Corpus Christi. The project started in 2013 and was supposed to be finished in 2016 but stalled due to non-payment issues. Now, over 40 mechanic’s liens worth more than 100 million dollars have been field on the project and Texas contractors are suffering.

As is the case in many of these situations, contractors cannot make payroll due to the fact that they scaled up their workforce for the project. Some are on the brink of going under due to the situation. For others the lack of cash flows has required them to turn down other work and they are forced to due small jobs to survive.

In looking at these situations, the question that we are typically asked is whether this situation is preventable and the unfortunate answer, is probably not. On a project this large, everything normally checks out during due diligence and contractors feel secure doing the project. Also, because the project is so large, it is unlikely that an owner or General Contractor will be willing to issue a lump sum payment. Progression invoices and payment applications (pay apps) are the standard in these situations.

The only silver lining is that with such a big company, solvency should not be an issue. If the liens are properly perfected and the contractor has good representation, they should eventually be able to collect payment. The challenge for the contractors will be in finding enough liquidity to afford to hire counsel and wait out the litigation.

It is not uncommon in these situations for a large non-paying entity to contest the quality of the work done by the contractor and use this as a reason to reduce the total amount owed. This is also grounds for the lien to be contested and litigated. A typical strategy is to try and drain the cash strapped contractor until it taps out by accepting a fraction of their original invoice in exchange for a lien release.

When this happens, it is important that the contractors stand behind the quality of their work and if necessary foreclose on their liens if they want to be paid in full. This is also why it is good practice for contractors to keep a pool of retained earnings and allocate a portion of the budget to dispute resolution.

Nothing in this article is to be considered legal advice. If you have questions or need representation due to nonpayment on a construction project , please call 832-930-0529 or email us at info@stephensbell.com

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