Tag Archives: subcontractor

When Dreams Turn to Nightmares: Why You Should Never Bet The Business On A Single Project

It’s the kind of project a Texas contractor would love to be involved in. There’s a huge plant going up. The project is approved by all required government entities. The state governor endorses it and it appears to be backed by more money than the Dallas Cowboys! What’s not to love right? Well, unfortunately, all that glitters is not always gold and for a number of Texas companies, this dream project became a nightmare.

In 2011, Mossi & Ghisolfi Group, an Italian petrochemical company decided to bring a multibillion dollar plastic plant to Corpus Christi. The project started in 2013 and was supposed to be finished in 2016 but stalled due to non-payment issues. Now, over 40 mechanic’s liens worth more than 100 million dollars have been field on the project and Texas contractors are suffering.

As is the case in many of these situations, contractors cannot make payroll due to the fact that they scaled up their workforce for the project. Some are on the brink of going under due to the situation. For others the lack of cash flows has required them to turn down other work and they are forced to due small jobs to survive.

In looking at these situations, the question that we are typically asked is whether this situation is preventable and the unfortunate answer, is probably not. On a project this large, everything normally checks out during due diligence and contractors feel secure doing the project. Also, because the project is so large, it is unlikely that an owner or General Contractor will be willing to issue a lump sum payment. Progression invoices and payment applications (pay apps) are the standard in these situations.

The only silver lining is that with such a big company, solvency should not be an issue. If the liens are properly perfected and the contractor has good representation, they should eventually be able to collect payment. The challenge for the contractors will be in finding enough liquidity to afford to hire counsel and wait out the litigation.

It is not uncommon in these situations for a large non-paying entity to contest the quality of the work done by the contractor and use this as a reason to reduce the total amount owed. This is also grounds for the lien to be contested and litigated. A typical strategy is to try and drain the cash strapped contractor until it taps out by accepting a fraction of their original invoice in exchange for a lien release.

When this happens, it is important that the contractors stand behind the quality of their work and if necessary foreclose on their liens if they want to be paid in full. This is also why it is good practice for contractors to keep a pool of retained earnings and allocate a portion of the budget to dispute resolution.

Nothing in this article is to be considered legal advice. If you have questions or need representation due to nonpayment on a construction project , please call 832-930-0529 or email us at info@stephensbell.com

THAT’S NOT YOUR MONEY YET! The Texas Construction Trust Fund Act

In an earlier post I explained the difficulties subcontractors face when trying to protect themselves against non-payment. Difficulties in complying with The Texas Property Code make perfection difficult for subs. However, The Texas Construction Trust Fund Act does give some protection.

According to the act, a contractor, subcontractor, or owner or an officer, director, or agent of a contractor, subcontractor, or owner, who receives trust funds or who has control or direction of trust funds, is a trustee of the trust funds and an artisan, laborer, mechanic, contractor, subcontractor, or materialman who labors or who furnishes labor or material for the construction or repair of an improvement on specific real property in this state is a beneficiary of any trust funds paid or received in connection with the improvement. Tex. Prop. Code § 162.002.

This means that essentially, almost anyone in connection with the project that receives trust funds is a trustee of the trust funds and anyone who provides labor or materials in connection with a project is a beneficiary. This begs the question, what are trust funds?

The statute answers the question below:

(a)  Construction payments are trust funds under this chapter if the payments are made to a contractor or subcontractor or to an officer, director, or agent of a contractor or subcontractor, under a construction contract for the improvement of specific real property in this state.

(b)  Loan receipts are trust funds under this chapter if the funds are borrowed by a contractor, subcontractor, or owner or by an officer, director, or agent of a contractor, subcontractor, or owner for the purpose of improving specific real property in this state, and the loan is secured in whole or in part by a lien on the property.

(c)  A fee payable to a contractor is not considered trust funds if:

(1)  the contractor and property owner have entered into a written construction contract for the improvement of specific real property in this state before the commencement of construction of the improvement and the contract provides for the payment by the owner of the costs of construction and a reasonable fee specified in the contract payable to the contractor; and

(2)  the fee is earned as provided by the contract and paid to the contractor or disbursed from a construction account described by Section 162.006, if applicable.

(d)  Trust funds paid to a creditor under this chapter are not property or an interest in property of a debtor who is a trustee described by Section 162.002.

Tex. Prop. Code § 162.001.

What this means is that most draw payments made to contractors are trust funds. These funds are to be used to pay subcontractors and cover building materials. In fact, a trustee who, intentionally or knowingly retains, uses, disburses, or otherwise diverts trust funds without first fully paying all current or past due obligations incurred by the trustee to the beneficiaries of the trust funds, is said to have misapplied trust funds. Depending on how much money was diverted or retained, this could result in a felony or a misdemeanor conviction. Tex. Prop. Code § 162.031 & § 162.032.

Nothing here is intended to be legal advice and should not be interpreted as such. Please consult a lawyer for any and all of your legal questions. If you believe someone has misapplied trust funds or if you’re accused of misapplying trust funds, give us a call at 832-930-0529 or email us at info@stephensbell.com. You can also visit our website www.StephensBell.com

 

M&M Liens: Pesky Perfection Problems

Any subcontractor who has been in business for quite some time has probably attempted to perfect an M&M lien. However the M&M perfection process is simply not subcontractor friendly and often times, subs miss perfection due to non-compliance with the statutes.

There are many of examples of difficult situations where a subcontractor will have to comply with statutory requirements in order to protect its interest but compliance with those requirements are sometimes nearly impossible. For example, let’s say a subcontractor begins a project in January that is expected to take eight months to complete and payment in full is due upon completion. Now let’s say that upon completion in September, the subcontractor is not paid. If the subcontractor is contracted directly with the primary contractor, the subcontractor has likely missed its opportunity to secure payment through perfection. How can this be?

Well, according to the Texas Property Code, the subcontractor must send a letter by certified mail, return receipt requested, to the owner and the primary contractor informing them of the unpaid claim not later than the 15th day of third calendar month following each month in which labor was performed or material delivered. Tex. Prop. Code § 53.056(b). This means that in order to protect it’s interest, the subcontractor would have had to predict that it would not be paid and sent notice to the primary contractor and the owner no later than April 15 to protect its interest for the labor done in January. The same would have to be done for the remaining months.

So why not simply send notice on every project? That’s a good question. The short answer is that a subcontractor will likely run a foul with the primary contractor and make the owner nervous. No construction professional or owner wants unnecessary payment concerns during their project and any sub that raises these concerns without a reason to raise them could find themselves in hot water. Think about it, would you want the holder of your car note to send you repossession notices every month even though you pay on time?

Our firm understands the frustration of subs in these situations and are familiar with strategies and statutory remedies that allow subs to feel secure about collecting payment. We’d love to sit down and discuss them with any subcontractor having problems.

Give us a call at 832-930-0529 today!